Boat Buying Part 2

Last time we began a discussion on how search out and locate that first or next boat. This time we’re going to continue and also look at some ideas on preparing your boat for sale.

Ok so now let’s assume that you’ve selected a model that meets your needs and found a candidate worth viewing. Let’s also assume that it’s listed with a broker and you have an appointment set up. It’s also mid-season and the boat is in the water and docked. While it’s not always possible, viewing a boat this way is usually a good thing. This way you get to see the finished product so to speak, boat with the mast up, canvas installed and power available. We’ll talk about bottom and rig inspections later. At this point you shouldn’t be worried about offers or surveys. You’re just at the looking stage for now.

Walking down the dock you get your first glimpse and this is where you experience the boat’s “curb appeal” and first impressions are formed. In many instances this can either make or break the sale. Remember that sellers.     At this point I’m going to go off on a tangent for a bit and talk to any potential sellers about preparing your boat to sell. I’m continually amazed at the condition of many boats that I board for pre-purchase inspections and the condition that they’ve been left in. I’ve seen dirty clothes left in lockers, bilges black with mildew, dirty dishes left aboard, and other things that I have literally tried to forget.        In real estate houses are staged prior to viewing and in the used car business cars are detailed in preparation for sale. This can make all the difference in the world to a potential buyer so why not do the same with your boat. I’m not saying that you have to give the boat a complete overhaul but simply remove any on board clutter that’s not needed, oil the wood, clean the bilges etc. On the exterior clean and polish the gel coat, clean the anti-skid, remove the black streaks on the hull. What this does is give the buyer (and the surveyor) the impression that the boat has been well care for and shows what we call “pride of ownership”. Yes it takes some time and effort but it will definitely pay off. In real estate they often take about a house’s “curb appeal” and trust me it’s no different with your boat. I head a saying years ago that goes like this. “You only have one chance to make a first impression”, so why not take full advantage. Whether it’s that first walk down the dock or in the boat yard that first impression can go a long way towards inspiring a potential buyer’s confidence.

I mentioned earlier about cleaning the bilges. I know that this is not a really nice job but here’s where you can get a lot of bang for your buck so to speak. Dirty bilges can produce bad odors especially if the boat has been closed up for a few days in warn weather and since our sense of smell is one of our strongest senses it’s the first thing that people notice when going below. Again it’s all about first impressions.

Most general purpose household cleaners, a rag, scrub brush or Scotchbrite and a little effort will easily do the job. Gloves are highly recommended. Rinse with clean water and pump it all out with the bilge pump or suck it up with a water vac. If you’re concerned about the watery mess that a garden hose can make down below, here’s a tip. Get one of those plastic sprayers generally used for garden pesticides (the ones with the hand pump) and use it to rinse out the bilges. They make great low pressure sprayers and will work anytime pressurized water is not available.

Back to that first viewing. I always recommend that you bring along a pen and note pad as well as a digital or cell phone camera. Take pictures of everything and I mean everything. Make notes of any issues and questions that you deem important. Let the broker or sales agent go over the boat with you. After this I always suggest that you ask the broker to let you examine the boat on your own for a while. Again take pictures and make notes. This way after you leave the boat you can load up the pictures on your PC or tablet and re-visit the boat after you emotions have settled down a bit. Notes and questions can be discussed with the broker or surveyor if you like the boat and get to that point in the process.

Next time we’ll discuss some of the specifics of that first inspection.

Reprinted From “The Seaworthy Surveyor” Ontario Sailor Magazine

Original Article By David Sandford AMS®

A Few Thoughts on That Next Boat Purchase Part1

As a Marine Surveyor, for me this has been a busy season. Lots of boat buying going on. It’s been pretty much a buyers market these past few years. It’s not so hot if you’re selling but if you’re in a position to buy the timing couldn’t be better. For the next few posts I’m going to go over the process of purchasing that first or next boat.

In my position as a surveyor, and being in the middle of the whole process I have usually have a front row seat to all this so I thought it might be prudent to review some of the common mistakes buyers make and discuss ways of avoiding them.

The first common mistake is that people make is that they get in a hurry, their emotions take over and this usually winds up costing them money. My advise here is to go slow, think things through and solicit professional assistance if necessary.

The next mistake commonly made is to purchase a vessel without having it surveyed. Believe it or not this happens more often than you might think. After the deal is closed the next step for the purchaser is to obtain insurance. On application one of the first comments made by the insurance company is “send us your survey.” The buyer is then sent scrambling to get the vessel surveyed and hopefully nothing major is uncovered. If it is then it’s up to the buyer to either try and re-negotiate with the seller or cover the repair cost themselves. I have to admit this happens more often on private sales as brokers usually press to have vessels surveyed as part of the process. I get involved in these deals every season and it’s tough to see people waste their hard earned money but its reality. Make the offer to purchase “conditional on survey” and allow enough time in closing for this to take place.

The next step in the boat buying process is to find a competent marine surveyor and arrange for the inspection of your potential purchase. This can be quite a chore in itself as surveyors come in all shapes, sizes and degrees of expertise. I could spend all day on this subject but I’ll try and stick to the most important points. Compile a list of the surveyors in your area. Your broker can usually supply you with this or simply look in the classifieds of local marine publications such as this one. Shop and compare pricing. Surveyors of quality and integrity will usually show similar pricing structures. Be wary of any quotes that are substantially higher or lower. With surveyors you usually get what you pay for. Ask top see a sample of their work. No reputable surveyor should have any problem with this request. As you read various survey reports you’ll soon become aware of the differences. Some will be three to four page inventory lists and some will be comprehensive twenty five page documentaries commenting on everything from the tasteful salon décor to the choice of hull color. A good survey report is usually somewhere in between. If the broker or marina states that they have their own “in house surveyor” be very cautious. There is the potential for a huge conflict of interest with this one. Ask if the surveyor carries liability insurance. Any surveyor should and if they don’t move on. Many marinas and yacht clubs will not allow un-insured surveyors to work on the grounds so this needs to be carefully considered. Finally be sure to contact your insurance company and verify if the surveyor you have selected will be accepted by the company. I often get called to re-survey boats that have just been surveyed and the insurance company would not accept the surveyor’s report.

This brings to the next mistake that is commonly made. The buyer does not to allow enough time have the vessel, hauled, surveyed, the report completed and the deal closed. This can vary depending upon the season but a time span of ten days to two weeks is not unreasonable. A boat purchase is usually an emotional experience and everyone’s in a hurry (the broker included) but remember, a considerable amount of money is being spent so try not to get carried away and let the process unfold as it should. You wouldn’t buy a house and expect the deal to close in three days. A boat purchase is no different. The process takes time. Marinas are busy and haul outs can be difficult to schedule. Surveyors are busy and since they have to co-ordinate their schedules around haul out times this can also be difficult. Once the survey inspection is completed it will usually take a couple of days for the surveyor to complete the written report.

Read the survey report carefully and question the surveyor on any issues that you deem important. Review the surveyor’s findings and recommendations with the broker or seller and ensure that you’re satisfied with the terms and conditions of the deal before closing.

Doing it this way can help you avoid many of the pitfalls and traps boat buyers can fall into as they try to rush the process and potentially save a few bucks in the process.

A Few Words on Carbon Monoxide from Boat Exhausts

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless gas that is a combustion by-product of both gas and diesel engines. When inhaled by the human body it is dangerous because it interferes with the blood system and the brain. In small doses it may only result in temporary illness but in larger doses it can progress to brain damage with possible internal hemorrhaging and even death. The first symptom of CO poisoning is drowsiness and sometimes nausea, the later of which is most often associated with diesel produced CO.

CO by itself is odorless, but you can always be sure that it is present by the smell of engine exhaust. In fact this is the best way to detect CO but over a period of time people can become intolerant to the smell and cease noticing it. CO is heavier than air and will tend to collect in lower areas of the hull especially cabin spaces and sleeping quarters.

The most common method by which CO accumulates in cabin spaces is via leaking engine and generator exhaust systems. All exhaust systems need to be inspected frequently. Like on your car, they don’t last forever and require maintenance. All inboard engines both gas and diesel have water cooled exhaust systems. Any time the exhaust system shows evidence of a water leak, there is a serious potential for a CO leak therefore if it’s leaking water, it’s probably leaking CO.

Boats are also somewhat prone to what is known as the “station wagon effect”. When the vessel is moving under engine power a vacuum is created behind the boat, which can actually draw the fumes on board and into the cabin. This can occur at speeds as low as four or five knots. Even though this can’t always be prevented ensuring that all windows and hatches are open keeping the cabin well ventilated is the best insurance. Also sometimes a slight course change which can alter the wind direction can help as well.

The amount of CO produced by a diesel engine is less than half that of a gasoline engine but it is still dangerous.  With diesel you are also being subjected to poisonous sulfur dioxide which is considerably less deadly, but it has a tendency to make you feel sicker. In rough water, it can increase the effects of, and often cause sea sickness. Long term exposure to diesel exhaust can do the same thing as short term exposure to gas exhaust. In either case, the condition has to be eliminated.

The installation of CO alarms in cabins is a good idea and they do work but like anything else they need to be maintained and kept in good order to be effective. Most surveyors that I know recommend their installation as part of a survey report and in reality it is just good common sense. They have become pretty much commonplace in our homes so why not out boats. The largest problem with alarms is that they are very sensitive to contaminants and when they do become contaminated they usually sound and then are disconnected and rendered inoperative.

The good news is that by simply being alert to the potential of the risk you can reduce the odds of this happening to you to nearly zero.

 

Reprinted From “The Seaworthy Surveyor” Ontario Sailor Magazine

Original Article By David Sandford AMS®

2016 Marine Survey Season

Well, its been a busy 2016 surveying season so far here on the North Shore of Lake Ontario. We had virtually  no spring this year and went right from winter to launch season. Like I said its been very busy and I apologize for my lack of posts these past couple of months. As it usually does, business has dropped off a bit in July and this year is no different but its still going.

In between a myriad of survey inspections and reports I have actually managed to sail my own boat a bit and have that the opportunity to race on ACE a Mumm 36 up and down the north shore and across the lake. In our club’s Wednesday night series I’ve been on a board a C&C 38 so I’ve been busy. On Wednesday this week its aboard ACE again for another across the lake overnighter, the Freeman Cup and after that on Friday, Saturday and Sunday its can racing as part of the LYRA regatta hosted by The Whitby Yacht Club.

Mumm 36

ACE, Mumm 36 racer

In the picture above, standing on the side deck is Dirk Stydenga, sailmaker extraordinaire former owner of Performance Sails in Toronto and now hails from Halifax Nova Scotia.

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