Boat Buying Part 3

In this post we are going to continue our discussion on boat buying and how to find that next boat. We’ll also go into some detail on the first preliminary inspection. Last time we talked about “curb appeal” and first impressions so that’s where we will begin. We’ll assume that its mid season and the boat has been launched and is at the dock.

As I’ve said before walking up the dock you will get your first glimpse of the boat and its right here the deal could be potentially either made or broken. The buyer’s emotions are running high at this point and a clean well-presented boat can go a long way to seal the deal so to speak. Remember this sellers.

As with any sailboat there will be lots to look at so try to break up you inspection into segments. As you board the boat try to stay on deck and start your inspection there. Walk the deck try to feel any soft spots and look for any issues regarding the condition of the gel coat. These will usually show up as small cracks known as spider cracks or crazing. These may or may not lead to more serious issues so make note of anything that appears questionable. Previous repairs should be noted as well and if possible question as to the history of why they were necessary.

Sight up the mast has look for any questionable issues there. Examine the standing rigging, looking for apparent issues such as surface corrosion cracked or bent swaged fittings. Give the furling unit s spin. Here a static test may not show any issues and testing under a sea trail may be the only way to accurately asses the condition of these units. Look at the running rigging, specifically polyester line. It should not be discoloured or feel stiff to when bent in your hands. Stiff polyester line means that breakage could eminent and replacement is the only solution. The condition of the running rigging is also a very good clue as to how the vessel has been maintained. Line replacement is usually not expensive and a well maintained boat will usually have running rigging in good condition so this is usually a good clue.

The same can usually be said for exterior canvas as used in dodgers and bimini’s so assess these items as well. Replacement of these components is usually expensive. Open the anchor locker, if equipped and look at the condition of the rode and fittings.

Inspect the cockpit for the same surface issues as the deck and cabin superstructure. Open and look inside all lockers. Clean and tidy is what we want to see here. Give all the winches a spin and feel for tightness or rough operation. Cycle the line clutches and any installed cam cleats. As I noted above running tests of components such as furling units may be the only way to accurately asses their condition and the same applies to winches, clutches and cleats etc. A sea trial is usually the only way and we’ll discuss this more at a later date.

Note the condition and vintage of the instrumentation. A well maintained boat will usually have functional and fairly up to date components installed.

A thorough examination of the hull and transom may be difficult due to accessibility but give it a look as best as you can and note any issues such as abrasions gouges, previous repairs and question anything suspicious..

Next time we’ll go below deck and discuss and continue our discussion there.